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Export your IIS websites list to a xls (Excel)

run cmd as admin’

> %windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd list site > c:\sites.xls

Install Nginx on CentOS 7

Step One—Add Nginx Repository

To add the CentOS 7 EPEL repository, open terminal and use the following command:

sudo yum install epel-release

Step Two—Install Nginx

Now that the Nginx repository is installed on your server, install Nginx using the following yum command:

sudo yum install nginx

After you answer yes to the prompt, Nginx will finish installing on your virtual private server (VPS).

Step Three—Start Nginx

Nginx does not start on its own. To get Nginx running, type:

sudo systemctl start nginx

If you are running a firewall, run the following commands to allow HTTP and HTTPS traffic:

sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=http 
sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=https
sudo firewall-cmd --reload

You can do a spot check right away to verify that everything went as planned by visiting your server’s public IP address in your web browser (see the note under the next heading to find out what your public IP address is if you do not have this information already):

http://server_domain_name_or_IP/

You will see the default CentOS 7 Nginx web page, which is there for informational and testing purposes. It should look something like this:

CentOS 7 Nginx Default

If you see this page, then your web server is now correctly installed.

Before continuing, you will probably want to enable Nginx to start when your system boots. To do so, enter the following command:

sudo systemctl enable nginx

Congratulations! Nginx is now installed and running!

How To Find Your Server’s Public IP Address

To find your server’s public IP address, find the network interfaces on your machine by typing:

ip addr
1. lo: <LOOPBACK,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 65536 qdisc noqueue state UNKNOWN

. . .
2: eth0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc pfifo_fast state UP qlen 1000

. . .

You may see a number of interfaces here depending on the hardware available on your server. The lointerface is the local loopback interface, which is not the one we want. In our example above, the eth0interface is what we want.

Once you have the interface name, you can run the following command to reveal your server’s public IP address. Substitute the interface name you found above:

ip addr show eth0 | grep inet | awk '{ print $2; }' | sed 's/\/.*$//'

Server Root and Configuration

If you want to start serving your own pages or application through Nginx, you will want to know the locations of the Nginx configuration files and default server root directory.

Default Server Root

The default server root directory is /usr/share/nginx/html. Files that are placed in there will be served on your web server. This location is specified in the default server block configuration file that ships with Nginx, which is located at /etc/nginx/conf.d/default.conf.

Server Block Configuration

Any additional server blocks, known as Virtual Hosts in Apache, can be added by creating new configuration files in /etc/nginx/conf.d. Files that end with .conf in that directory will be loaded when Nginx is started.

Nginx Global Configuration

The main Nginx configuration file is located at /etc/nginx/nginx.conf. This is where you can change settings like the user that runs the Nginx daemon processes, and the number of worker processes that get spawned when Nginx is running, among other things.

See More

Once you have Nginx installed on your cloud server, you can go on to install a LEMP Stack.

 

Full post  DigitalOcean

 

stop/start IIS 7 application on command line.

@echo off

appcmd start sites “site1”
appcmd stop sites “site2”

Exporting and Importing Sites and App Pools from IIS 7 and 7.5

To Export the Application Pools on IIS 7 :
%windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd list apppool /config /xml > c:\apppools.xml

This will export all the application pools on your webserver, therefor you need to edit the apppools.xml and remove the application that you do not need to import for example:

  • DefaultAppPool
  • Classic .NET AppPool
  • SecurityTokenServiceApplicationPool

And other apppools that already exist on the second webserver, appcmd doesn’t skip already existing apppools, it just quit’s and doesn’t import any.

To import the Application Pools:
%windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd add apppool /in < c:\apppools.xml

All the AppPools in the xml will be created on your second webserver.

To Export all your website:
%windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd list site /config /xml > c:\sites.xml

This will export all the websites on your webserver, therefor you need to edit the sites.xml and remove the websites that you do not need to import for example:

  • Default Website

And all other websites that already exist on the second webserver.

To Import the website:
%windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd add site /in < c:\sites.xml

It’s also possible to export a single website or application pool all you need to do is add the name of the Application Pool or Website to the command line:

To export/import a single application pool:
%windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd list apppool “MyAppPool” /config /xml > c:\myapppool.xml

Import:
%windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd add apppool /in < c:\myapppool.xml

To export/import a single website:
%windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd list site “MyWebsite” /config /xml > c:\mywebsite.xml

Import:
%windir%\system32\inetsrv\appcmd add site /in < c:\mywebsite.xml

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